It’s been six months since I covered how to get an earlier version of TP-Link’s Omada AP controller setup and running on Debian 9, and since then TP-Link has really stepped up their game in regards to their software. A host of new features have since been added, such as bulk AP firmware upgrades, wireless channel steering, mesh networking, etc.

However the front-end features aren’t all that’s changed, on the back-end user segregation and automatic daemon start on boot comes setup right out of the box. Not only that but optimizations to the application mean that now the controller initializes much faster than in previous versions. All things said, the way this software has matured and grown have made it a serious competitor to other solutions on the market like Ubiquiti’s UniFi or Cisco’s Meraki in my mind.

So, after hearing all of this how can we attain such a glory for ourselves? Well, it turns out to be pretty straight forward actually…

Doing a Fresh Install of the Omada Controller on Debian “Buster”

Right out the gate I’ll assume that you’ve already done the basics, like upgrading your base install with apt-get, configuring it with a static IP, etc. So to get started we’ll make sure our dependencies are sorted.

The controller relies on two packages that don’t ship with Debian by default, those are curl and jsvc. In addition, the Omada .deb we’ll be downloading from TP-Link will be zipped, so we’ll need unzip to handle that. Installing all three packages is as easy as:

apt-get install curl jsvc unzip

Next up we’ll want to pull the latest version of Omada from TP-Link’s site. For this I’ll be using wget:

wget https://static.tp-link.com/2019/201903/20190325/omada_v3.1.4_linux_x64_20190228110851.deb.zip

Admittedly, the filename is pretty horrendous – good thing wildcards exist… Moving on, we’ll unzip the .deb to the current working directory like such:

unzip omada*

And then proceed to remove the .zip archive before finally using dpkg to install the .deb package.

rm -r *.zip
dpkg -i omada*

Assuming everything went smoothly, the controller should now be installed and the tpeap daemon should be running. Congratulations!

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Hey, thank you for your post. I have a question: If a tip: tpeap start, my raspberry pi said: [ok] Starting Omado Controller, but after a few minutes nothing happened. Have you an idea why?